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What’s in a name? Keeping your maiden name in the workplace.

Well fact fans – 3 weeks this Saturday I am getting married! Apologies if you – as candidate or as client – have heard my excited little voice on the end of the phone in recent weeks (ok… months) – but it is not long to go now until I will no longer be “Rozie Rhodes”. A lot of clients and candidates have asked me “are you going to change your name for work?”. It has always been something of a no brainer for me, I always thought I would change my name when I got married. Perhaps that has been a tradition thing (and I’m quite soppy like that) – but I hadn’t thought about the impact of changing ones name in the workplace, particularly when you have built up a reputation in the market with clients and candidates alike.

So I looked into it… In recent polls apparently one in three new brides now choose to keep their maiden name and only 62% of wives in their 20s opt to take their husband’s name. For those in their 30s that percentage rises to 74%. When asked why they had chosen to do so, a number of women said that they felt they were losing their identity by giving their name away, others have questioned why it should be the woman who changes their name – why not the man? And others simply state that they are known in their workplace and market by their maiden name, and their reputation may be affected if they change it. I understand that reasoning completely, especially in a world like recruitment.

So I have really given it some thought, and debated whether to stick as Miss Rhodes or change my name come the 9th May. My closest clients and candidates have pretty much followed me throughout this entire process (thank you!), and I will no doubt have many a conversation with them after it (sorry!). I would hope that if they wanted to recommend me to any of their friends or associates, my maiden name should not play a part. I pride myself on the long term relationships I forge with my clients and candidates, and I think I am well known for having that level of familiarity that would mean they would simply recommend me as Rozie at BCL Legal, and my maiden or married name should not need to be included.

In the grand scheme of things, what is in a name? It is, of course completely down to personal choice. But I have to be honest with myself – I have been twirling round with a white tea towel on my head for a veil since I was 3 years old. I have been practicing my new signature for the last 6 months. So, one and all – next time you hear from me I will be signing off as Mrs Rozie Hunter… but you can just call me Rozie from BCL Legal (smiley face and very excited bride to be).

For more information please contact Rozie Rhodes or visit our website BCL Legal.

 

Comments

emma anthony

April 28, 2015 at 12:26 pm

Love this Rozie, sorry Mrs Hunter!

  • emma anthony
    Posted April 28, 2015 at 12:26 pm | Permalink

    Love this Rozie, sorry Mrs Hunter!

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